Home > George Mason University Oral History Program

George Mason University Oral History Program

The scholarly significance of oral history is in documenting people's memories and life experiences, which otherwise might never have been recorded as written documents. From an educational perspective, oral histories add richness and personal perspective to the historical record and can engage students and scholars in a lively study of history.

The voices and reflections of the men and women who built George Mason University, the student and his future wife who built Mason's first campus telescope, the governor who made George Mason University independent from the University of Virginia, and the basketball coach who led a team to a Final Four appearance that shocked the world - all of them, and many others, can be found in the George Mason University Oral History Program collection.

The George Mason University Oral History Program began in 1999 to capture the stories of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and other figures in the history of George Mason University. Since its conception, the program has conducted more than 200 interviews. To learn more about the collection, and to view full interviews, please contact the program at the Special Collections Research Center by phone (703) 993-2220 or email (speccoll@gmu.edu).